Some questioned Brown’s decision to go pro with only one full season of collegiate experience under his belt.

When you’re talking about the draft’s best player, it can be easy to poke holes. Garrett at times struggles to get off blocks, and he’ll probably never be an ace run stopper at the edge. Sometimes he’ll overrun the play. His best production came against bad competition.

But when you look at the whole, he’s a marvelous talent. A three-year player at Texas A&M, Garrett finished with 145 tackles, 48.5 tackles for loss, 32.5 sacks, and seven forced fumbles. At 6’4, 272 pounds and with 35-inch arms, Garrett has prototypical size. His athleticism has never been more obvious than it was when he ran a 4.64 40-yard dash at the combine.

He’s not Von Miller quick, but no one ever will be, and Garrett is close. He possesses that first-step burst you want. How Garrett moves after that first step is what puts him over the top. He builds on speed with more speed. When he wants to mix up his pass rush, instead of bending the edge he employs a nasty spin move. If the Browns are creative, they’ll use him with his hand in the dirt and standing up. Garrett excels at the little things: He gets his hands up to bat down passes and finishes tackles. He rarely came off the field at A&M. He was slowed by a leg injury in 2016 but attempted to play through it.

Garrett is the best player — not just the best edge player — to be in the draft since Jadeveon Clowney in 2014.

Some questioned Brown’s decision to go pro with only one full season of collegiate experience under his belt. But the wideout found confidence in the decision having gone through his injury and rehab, both mentally and physically.

“That was one of the biggest parts of my decision. When I was hurt, I realized how quickly football could be taken away. This is the dream of my childhood,” Brown said.nike_cardinals_1225

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